Simple Homemade Almond Milk
August 22, 2009

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Happy weekend, guys!

One of the most frequently asked questions I get from new clients is, “what about milk?”

This usually demands a multi-part answer. If the client is asking whether or not it’s OK to have some dairy once in a while, I’ll need to listen to her level of transition and get a sense of her goals. I’m no great fan of cow’s milk dairy, but I certainly believe that there can be a place for organic (if not raw and organic) dairy in a transitional diet.

If she’s looking to reduce dairy in her diet, and she’s asking what kind of milk substitute I recommend, the answer is always the same: nut milk. Yes, soymilk is an option, too: I certainly recommend it over cow’s milk dairy. But it’s heavily processed, and most women find that it can lead to bloating and gas  – in addition to the fact that many women (myself included) like to take it easy with soy.

And when there are such delicious things as hemp and almond milk in the world, why bother with soymilk?

Nut milk is heavenly. It’s sweet, mild, and gentle on the belly. It’s light enough to serve as a neutral base in smoothies and soups — unlike soy milk, which tends to have a distinctive aftertaste — yet pleasantly sweet. Best of all, it digests seamlessly — unlike conventional dairy, which so many among us (especially those of you who are lactose intolerant) find difficult to stomach.

There are a number of good brands of nut milk on the market. I enjoy Blue Diamond, which is a good value and a nice, sweet taste. Pacific Foods makes a wonderful variety of almond and hemp milks (I like the vanilla flavor). And my current favorite is a brand called That’s Nut Milk, which is as close to homemade as you can find on the markety.

But truth be told, there’s very little reason to spend money on a store bought brand. Nut milk is one of the very easiest raw food products to make at home! Sure, if you don’t have the energy or time, a store bought brand is fine. But I think you’ll find that investing just a little effort in homemade nut milk pays off in a big way. You can adjust flavors, sweetness, and best of all, you can feel a sense of pride in having created your nut milk from scratch. And if you purchase nuts from the bulk bin at your local health food store, you’ll also be able to save money.

Here’s what it takes to make nut milk:

Almonds

Water

Sweetener/flavorings if desired

A blender (regular or high speed)

Yes. That’s it. And there’s barely any recipe to remember — only a ratio. It takes one cup of nuts to four parts water to make a batch of nutmilk. To this, you add the seasonings you like: for plain nutmilk, add a dash of salt, no more. For vanilla almond milk (my usual) add a few dates and a teaspoon of vanilla. And so on.

Tonight, I was in the mood for some vanilla almond milk. So I followed my favorite recipe:

Vanilla Almond Milk (yields 2-3 cups or so)

1 cup almonds, soaked 8-12 hours beforehand if it’s possible
4 cups water
6 dates or 1/4 cup agave
1 tsp pure vanilla extract (or the contents of a vanilla bean)

Procedure:

Begin by soaking your nuts in some water, if you can. Eight hours is ideal, but an hour is fine if that’s what you’ve got!

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Next, rinse off your almonds and discard the soak water. Add the almonds and the other ingredients (water, dates, vanilla) to a regular blender or a VitaMix. Blend them on high speed:

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Let it go for a minute or so.

At this point, you can serve the nut milk exactly as is — you’ll simply have to give it a good shake before pouring!

If you prefer a smooth texture, though, you’ll want to give it a strain. To do this, you’ll need a large container, and some cheesecloth. Or if you plan to make nut milk on a regular basis, go ahead and invest in a nut milk bag!

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They’re cheap, conveniant, and can be used again and again (unlike cheesecloth) to strain nut milks and soups. You can purchase them from One Lucky Duck and other raw stores on the web.

To use, simply place the the nut milk bag or cheesecloth over the mouth of your container, leaving a generous overhang and allowing the strainer to droop about halfway down into the container. I used a large mason jar as my container:

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To fasten the bag/cheesecloth in place, use a rubberband around the mouth of the container:

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Next, pour all the almond milk into the container, so that it drips through the cheesecloth and into the container below:

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Take off, do some errands, read a good book, watch a movie, or whatever. Within forty-five minutes (or, ideally, an hour or two), all of the liquid will have been strained, and you’ll be left with almond pulp, like so:

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You can use this for raw cookies, for nut pates, or simply as a nut-butter-like treat.

Meanwhile, you’ll have three or so cups of fresh, delicious almond milk, ready to enjoy in smoothies, in soups, or plain! It should last about 2-3 days in the fridge. I’ve seen it last longer — if it tastes at all sour to you, you’ll know its time has come.

Tonight, I opted for a classic treatment:

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Cause sometimes we all just need some cookies and (nut)milk.

Let’s see that again:

almond-milk-028-500x375

If you’re wondering, those are the amazing raweos! Introduced to me by Melissa, these are now among my very favorite raw treats 🙂

There are tons of ways to enjoy nutmilk. You can make it with cashews (for a super neutral taste), with hemp seeds (protein rich and distinctive), macadamias, or pecans. And you can adjust seasonings to taste. My favorite varities?

Chocolate nut milk: To the recipe for vanilla almond milk, add 2 tbsp raw cacao nibs or unsweetened cocoa powder

Cinnamon milk: To the recipe for vanilla almond milk, add 1 tsp cinnamon and a dash of nutmeg

Chai milk: To the recipe for vanilla almond milk, add 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon garam masala, and 1/4 tsp. nutmeg

Sugar-free vanilla milk: In place of the dates, add stevia to taste

So…what are you guys waiting for?! Stop dropping pennies on store bought nut milks, and get blending!! Once you experience the joy of homemade almond (and other nut) milks, you’ll never want to go back. Give the procedure a shot, and let me know how it goes!

Happy weekend to you all.

xo

Categories: Raw

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    272 Comments
  1. I know this is years after some of these posts, but I’m wondering if homemade almond milk that has begun to taste a little sour is still safe to use in baking. I have a paleo recipe for an almond “cornbread” that uses cashew or almond milk and am wondering if I could still use it in that to eliminate having to throw so much away. Thanks for any help you can give me. Blessings!

    • Hi Janet,

      My gut instinct is that it probably would be OK, but I think the responsible answer is to tell you that you should discard any that’s sour, just to be super safe 🙂

      G

  2. Perhaps you might also add that by making your own milk you will also be helping the planet because you will not be disposing of the empty ‘store bought’ cartons.

  3. Hi Gena,

    I made this and it was delicious but it seems to have started to go bad after only 1 1/2-ish days. 🙁

    I want to get into the habit of making my own almond milk to get away from the stabilizers/preservatives/unpronounce-ables in the carton stuff but I totally can’t afford to make a batch every other day (both in terms of time and in terms of $$$).

    I used raw, unpasteurized almonds that were soaked for ~24 h at room temp and stored it in the fridge in a tightly sealed mason jar. The jar was pretty much fresh from the dishwasher and my fridge is reasonably cold so I’m not sure where I went wrong.

    Any ideas or pointers? Have you found that different batches of almond milk might vary in how long they last. I’m hoping this was a fluke but I’m super disappointed – not disappointed in your recipe just disappointed to toss out 1.5 cups of formerly delicious almond milk.

    Thanks a bunch,

    Aidan

    • Hi Aiden,

      My honest answer is that I’m really not sure! Mine has usually lasted a full 2-3 days, but I’ve had it go off after 1.5, too—and I haven’t really discerned what causes the occasional shorter lived batch. What I might suggest is that you keep making it in a half-portion, so that if you do happen to have a batch expire sooner, you’re not wasting many almonds. If you start to find that the batches always last longer than 1.5 days, you can assume this was a fluke and start making larger batches.

      I know this is an imperfect solution, but I hope that it is helpful—homemade nut milks can definitely be a little unpredictable!

      G

  4. I have made almond milk with 1:3.5 water. soaked them for 8 hours before i blended them. Strained them and transferred into a water bottle. The consistency was fresh and creamy. I left it outside the refrigerator for few hours and it split badly, turned sour as well. It became flaky. What is wrong? I can send the picture if anyone could help me understand this

  5. Hello :-). Thank you so much for posting this totally awesome recipe! I’m into canning and I was wondering if you’ve ever canned this milk? I use a water bath and not a pressure canning pot. Thanks! 🙂

  6. […] Almond milk and hemp milk are my two standard homemade nut milk recipes, but I love branching out every now and then. I’ve recently experimented with Brazil nut milk and homemade coconut milk (I especially like the former). In the past, I’ve made tahini milk, pumpkin seed milk, and cashew milk as well. I’ve always thought about pecan milk, and since I associate pecans with the holidays, I thought this was the right time of year to test it out. The milk, which is infused with vanilla and cinnamon, exceeded all of my expectations. I’m excited to give it to friends this year, and I hope you will be too. […]

  7. Agave syrup is like corn syrup- super processed, not healthy by a longshot (got popular with good marketing only). I recommend using maple syrup or dates instead.

    • Agreed! It’s higher in fructose than high fructose corn syrup! If only more people knew about the agave scam.

  8. Hi, just a question as I am attempting to use this recipe in the weekend. Roughly how almond milk can we make from 1 cup of almond? And how long can the milk be stored in the fridge? I possibly don’t have time to make them every morning so I’m thinking of making a big batch and use it over the week.

    Cheers,

    • It’s about 3 1/2 cups after straining, and it should last for 2-3 days in an airtight container in the fridge. I’ve had it go longer, but I want to give you a modest estimate!

  9. Do you use organic nuts? I’m still trying to decide whether to keep buying them organic or not. What do you think?

    • Does this homemade milk still have all the vitamins the store bought ones have? Like vitamin D and calcium?

  10. […] stocked up on raw organic almonds. I soaked them overnight and made a delicious, creamy and sweet raw almond milk this morning. And, incidentally, making nut milk happens to be yet another one of those things that […]

  11. Hi, if one is using a vitamix machine there will be no pulp to stain will there?? Is this ok,will it make a difference in any way….. Higher calories, / creamer consistency.
    Thank you for your help. Suz.

  12. The “raweos” page doesn’t seem to exist anymore. Is there anywhere else I can find the recipe? Thanks 🙂

    Excited to try making nut milk for the first time! Just waiting for the nut milk bag to arrive.

  13. Do you know what nutrients are left behind in the pulp? I’m just wondering if i will lose all the protein from the almonds when the milk is strained, or if the pulp is more fiber and carbs….thanks!

  14. My spouse and I absolutely love your blog and find many of your post’s to
    be exactly what I’m looking for. Does one offer
    guest writers to write content in your case? I wouldn’t mind composing a post or elaborating on a lot of the subjects you write in relation to here.
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  15. Is this almond milk suitable to make yoghurt out of ? If so, how long do you think it will stay fresh for in the fridge. Thanks

  16. I use the almond pulp from making the milk to make energy snacks. To the pulp from 1 cup of almonds used for milk, I add 8 oz of raw almond butter or peanut butter (I use all organic), one cup of uncooked oatmeal, one cup shredded coconut, 1/2 c giant raisins and 1/2 c raw pistachios (I buy nuts and fruits from Braga Farms in California) I add 1/4 Mexican vanilla, a pinch of chipolte flakes, one tablespoon cocoa powder (unsweetened). I mix with a fork or pastry blender, roll in walnut size balls and store in freezer. These make great desserts and energy snacks

  17. I often take the skin off the almond nut before making my milk to give it that real milk look, what’s the advantage of leaving the skin in.
    Thanks to all the other contributors for all your cool tips.

    • Good question!! What is the advantage of leaving the skin in?? Does anybody know?? I do know the DISADVANTAGE of the skin. Pythic acid. That does not come out with soaking. It needs to be neutralized with e.g. tea spoon of lemon juice. Too much Pythic acid makes it difficult to absorb vitamins and minerals. It is part of the skin of nuts, grains and seeds. Not all have it. Wheat is the worst. Buckwheat has none. (look it up on the net if you want to know more) What is the point of eating healthy food but you cannot absorb the goodness because you have too much Pythic acid. By the way, anybody thought about growing your own almonds? Easy to grow and very pretty blossoms. Certainly no rubbish in your homegrown homemade almond milk. 😉

  18. Hi all- just because something is posted on a nice blog doesn’t mean you should abide by its information. A couple things you should know about milk substitutes- soy… is hardly ever a healthful option. It is hardly ever truly organic and true non-gmo soy is quite difficult to find. About 90% or more of soy is genetically modified, so although it may be labeled otherwise, it’s best to stay away. In most commercial grocery stores you will not find truly raw almond milk or cows milk. Cows milk is either pasteurized or homogenized unless found otherwise by direct farmers or even farmers markets. You will not find truly raw almonds in most commercial or organic grocery stores period. Almonds are either irradiated, steamed or dry roasted stripping the nut of its nutrients to begin with, although they may be labeled raw. And honestly, I’m a vegan as of now but there is no perfect diet, not even the raw vegan diet is the key to health, so do with what you can, stay away from processed store bought milks of any kind, cow’s, soy OR almond. Raw cow’s milk or nut mylk is where you should be investing your money if interested in keeping a “milk” in your diet. Be gentle with yourself, and food is fun and interesting, especially raw food once you’ve entered its fad, but ask yourself if lately it’s been front and center of your thoughts above all, and if it is, well that should tell you enough. Enjoy life, eat to live not live to eat.. it’s a way of eating not an area or excuse for you to obsess over. Be well and live long Namaste ~

  19. Your post mentions only needing to soak for an hour (if that’s all the time you have). I assume you are using raw almonds but now I’m confused as to how long almonds should be soaked for in order to ensure they are free of the phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors that are supposed to be harder on the gut. Is an hour all it takes to remove them and the rest of the soak time (when recipes call for 8-12 hours or more) simply for texture? Thank you! Loving your recipes.

  20. Could you make quite a bit and have just enough to keep in the fridge, and freeze the rest? My boys are 4 and drink milk like crazy! I want something better for them, but I would have to make it every other day. Just trying to make it easier on myself.

  21. I just learned that carrageenan, a common ingredient in some almond milks such as Pacific Foods and Blue Diamond have some serious well-documented health concerns. There is a movement to try to get it removed from organic, and there are brands out there without carageenen. FYI. Thanks for the recipe and for posting this info so we all can stay on top of our heath– the carrageenan led me here to make my own.

  22. So I tried making this the other night, it did get a little watery. I did not soak the almonds, will soaking them make it less watery or should i simply use less water? Thanks

    • I have not tried it, Jessica, but please feel free to try and let me know how it goes. I can’t imagine why it wouldn’t work.

  23. I got too impatient and did this after about 6hours, my blender is a little cheap and feeble but it seemed to do nicely, the almond meal was a little larger though i’m wondering if I can try and grind it again on its own. The milk was a little watery for me but then i’ll just reduce the water next time, otherwise it is absolutely stellar and i’ll never buy storebought again 🙂 thankyou for showing me the light !

  24. I broke down how much it costs to make my own almond milk with 5 lbs of store bought bulk Raw Organic Whole Shelled Almond (ROWSA) and here’s what I got:

    – 1 lbs = 3 cups. (That’s a conservative figure); 5 lbs = 15 cups
    – I make a single batch with 1 cup of ROWSA at the time and get 6 cups of almond milk using this recipe:

    1 cup almonds, soaked and rinsed (Up to 24 hours in Fridge)
    2.5 Tsp Maple syrup (or 6 pitted dates)
    6 cups water (you may use only 5 for thicker milk)
    Pinch sea salt
    1 tbs vanilla extract (optional)

    Blend almond with only 2 cups of water to produce fine almond meal. Then filter with Cheesecloth or create your own filter bag made of fine fabric.

    – This makes 90 cups of almond milk;
    – There’s 45 pints in 90 cups;
    – Each store bought almond milk cartons is 2 pints; 45 pints/2 = 22.5 cartons
    – So you’ll need to buy 22.5 cartons at $3.00 (Also a conservative figure) to get the same quantity of homemade almond milk; 22.5 cartons @ $3.00 = $67.50
    – The cost of 5 lbs of ROWSA is $37.50 (I get mine online at Azurestandard.com)
    – Even at $10.00/lbs ($50) it’s still a good and clean deal! No Carrageenan, additive of all sort and waste…speaking of which HERE’S ONE DELICIOUS WAY TO USE YOUR ALMOND MEAL (I dry mine in a toaster oven @ 175 F for 25 minutes moving the meal around every 10 min.):

    DRY INGREDIENTS:

    -3 cups (450g) of almond meal
    -2 tsps baking soda
    -1/2 tsp salt

    WET INGREDIENTS:

    -1/4 cup (60ml) coconut oil melted
    -4 large eggs

    -2 very ripe bananas, mashed
    -3 tsps vanilla
    -3 tsps cinnamon
    -1/2 cup (50g) of walnut, chopped
    -1/2 cup of carob chips (optional)

    1. Preheat oven to 350C(175F)
    2. Combine DRY INGREDIENTS in a small bowl
    3. In separate bowl mix together coconut oil and eggs
    4. Mix the flour combination into oil and eggs, stir until well blended.
    5. Add mashed bananas, vanilla and cinnamon. Fold in walnuts and carob chips.
    6. Pour batter into a greased loaf pan. Bake for 25-30 min. or until a toothpick comes out clean.

    Enjoy!

    • Thank you. I was just led here because I learned about Carrageenan — I am kind of mad to know that this is put in our so-called healthy food. I have been drinking more than I want to have – -now I will make my own and save money!

  25. […] One thing that presents a challenge is milk substitutes. Store-bought soy and almond milks contain more than one ingredient, so I have been experimenting with making my own. I’ll probably make a 3-4 day batch of one and alternate back and forth. These are super easy to make with a good blender and there are plenty of great recipes online if you’re interested in trying it yourself. [See Soy Milk Recipe or Almond Milk Recipe] […]

  26. You did not add a VERY important step!!! Make sure the almonds are rinsed off after soaking before you blend in vitamix 🙂

  27. You forgot to mention to rinse the almonds after they are soaked. This is an important step because the almonds release inhibitors while they soak, which are very hard to digest!

    • I don’t know where you guys/gals are looking but her second step – it’s literally the NEXT step is to rinse the soaked beans!!! She did not forget to mention it, you overlooked it in your reading. 🙂

  28. I’m making this today and am super excited!! The almonds have been soaking all night. During an Ayurvedic nutrition course I learned that the skins of almonds are toxic and you should always remove them, so I’ll be doing that first!
    Much thanks and love from Amsterdam – Holland!

  29. Does the water used to soak the almonds need to be drained & then new water added before putting the almonds & water in a blender?
    Thanks.

    • Yes, I would definitely rinse the off after soaking. I always rinse my sprouted almonds, as they accumulate a white foamy substance on their surface after soaking.

  30. Just tried this recipe (I used the agave) for the first time tonight. It’s still straining, but I couldn’t resist tasting some of what had already strained. It tastes so good and so fresh, and I’m sure that it will taste even better after it’s been refrigerated and gotten cold.

    Thanks for this, and for this website. We just recently discovered this site and look forward to trying many recipes from it in the days/weeks to come!

    steve 🙂

  31. This was a very easy to do recipe . I also used my food processor , then strained the milk through a reusable produce bag that I had bought at a local health food store .It looks exactly like the nut bag in your picture .

  32. I’m interested in raw food but didn’t have a chance making any raw food yet.
    I’m planing to do an almond milk as my first raw food drink but have heard that raw almond is toxic.Is it true ?is it okay to eat it raw?
    Thank you

    • Almonds are eaten raw all the time – not toxic at all; although cooked almonds are great with oatmeal – cooked with the oats. Soaking them can be benificial, as it removes something acidic, which is only a concern if you have an allergic reaction to the smallest amount of acid – not common as far as I know.

      • Almonds sold in US stores aren’t raw, due to health/safety laws, even bough they’re often labeled raw. They are heat/chemical treated. Some farmers have licenses to sell small punts of purely raw almonds but you must but them in person rather than online. You can search for more info online.

  33. GREAT tasting recipes! I just made some today and even the kids love it sweetened with dates. I tried 3 different types of cloth to strain the pulp out, and each time they clogged up and it took forever to drain through.Is this normal? Suggestions on cloth? I went to using a tea sieve and spoon to clear the screen and it works much faster but leaves in some fine pulp. Also I was wondering what do you do with the excess pulp? I would hate to throw it out, it tastes good, and I was thinking I could make a merangue type cookie out of it…I’ll get back to you with the recipe if it works out! Any other suggestions on using the pulp?

  34. I used my food processor to grind the nuts. It took longer to strain… but yeilded a much creamier textured milk. Thanks!

  35. There is one nondairy milk available in Turkey: a bland soy milk that is prohibitive in cost and contains artificial flavors and other chemicals.
    The dates found in Turkey, however, are magnificent, and so was my almond milk! I’m looking forward to baking with it. Thank you for the post!

  36. Hi Gena,

    I just love your recipe collection here and look forward to trying them. Would love to know how to make the Raweos but the link doesn’t work. Can you please post or send this recipe. Thank you!

  37. I just made the basic recipe with nuts, water, dates and vanilla and it’s quite good. The texture, however, is not what I’m used to. How would you recommend making it more creamy?

      • Almond butter can make a creamy almond milk. it is so easy to make without a blender. When I was at a fairly remote cabin, I ran out of soy milk. This recipe is one I found in “Vegan a go – go” by Sarah Kramer – a Canadian
        2 tablespoons of almond butter to a cup of water. I had an empty jar, into which I put the latter ingredients; I then shook the jar ( screw lid on very tightly!). I had it without sweetener and added it to my muesli and fruit, and it worked very well. Makes approx. 1 1/4 cups. Recipe called for blender, but with no power, it was so simple in a jar. Use within 24 hours.

        • if you use water that’s been boiled and cooled, and a sterilized jar you can make your nut milk last longer. I never make a recipe that I hope to keep in the fridge without using these simple hints so that my recipe will last as long as possible. Also for frugality I sometimes will bring something like nutmilk to a simmer and hold it there for five minutes to kill any germs so that I can extend the shelf life another 3 to five days. it doesn’t have to boil to kill off the germs. The commercial nut milks are boiled so it’s no stretch to boil you own creation and not let it go to waste.

          • Thanks for that tip! Do you boil it as soon as you make it or can you wait a couple of days until you know it might be going off. I make him almond date milk-nice combination. I considered adding vitamin D capsules because I think vitamin E is a natural preservative…

    • I use three cups of water per one cup of dry almonds. It will thicken after it chills. A little touch of stevia or agave nector will impart a bit more sweetness and mimick cow’s milk a bit more. Good luck!

    • What I’ve been doing is using a bit more almonds, so 1 1/2 perhaps to 4 cups water, that should make it creamier, play with it until you like what you get. It’ll never be as creamy as cow’s milk though.

  38. Just a week or two ago I’ve decided to go raw for health reasons, and now that I have, I’ve noticed a difference in how I feel overall. Not sluggish, not bloated, not congested… I’ve made a few recipes but I am looking for other ways to “create” in the kitchen.
    Thanks so much for the pics and the step-by-step instructions. I’m excited! I never thought I could drink milk again. I plan on making my milk now (thanks to you!)

  39. hey I have made almond milk several times according to instructions and for some reason it is only lasting me 1 day in the fridge..the next day it smells sour and i have to throw it away..do you have any idea why this is happening?

    thanks

  40. Hi Gena,
    Thanks very much for this ridiculously easy method to make a viable alternative to dairy and soy [which by the way I believe is not an alternative considering all the processing, additives and GM considerations]. I haven’t tried this yet but I most certainly will 🙂

  41. I just tried this recipe. I’ve never made almond milk, but it’s amazing and so easy! I don’t want to go back to buying soy milk. It’s really rewarding making fresh and delicious food like this. Thank you!

  42. […] Almond milk, surprisingly mmmmm, from a favorite blog- Choosing Raw. I tried making the suggested cookies out of the almond meal left from the milk-making. They didn’t even rate meh on my scale. They went into the garbage. I think the almond meal was not dry enough. I will try them again with some tweaks. […]

  43. This recipe is delicious and easy! My husband and I like this much better than store bought almond milk. Thank you so much!
    Sandy

  44. Hi,

    I use 100 grams per 1700 cc of water. I put it into my SOYMILK MAKER – SoyLOVE and in 20 mins I have almond milk.

    100 grams is about = 1/2 cup approx of almonds.

    I get my almonds cheap at COSTCO. I can also get them in my local grocery store HEB grocery like a Krogers, Ralphs, they have a bulk area and I get almonds there.

    I strain mine quickly with two bowls – one stainless steel and one glass ( I need to get another large stainless bowl. In between I use a fine seive strainer I found at the HONG KONG MARKET for one dollar. it’s large like a one for pasta but has a fine screen on it. Some people use a gold tone coffee filter as a seive.
    I go back and forth about four times, rising the seive with water as I go. It makes about 3/4 full in a quart rubbermaid container.

    I put in 1 tsp. of clear vanilla extract – WILTON in the cake section of Michaels
    a dash of sea salt – 1/8th tsp.. 1/4 cup agave for a sweetner. You can use another kind. You must shake before serving.

    Since mine is HOT it has to cool down. It last 3 days. YUMMERS!
    GOOD luck with yours.

  45. I had a delicious ginger soy latte at a vegan restaurant and tried making it with almond milk and ginger juice (just got a juicer) and heated it and it was so so so good! thanks for the recipe. will be making my first batch tomorrow.

  46. I LOVE almond milk – I make it every other day for my 14 month old dairy allergic little one. Thanks for the tutorial!

  47. Hi. I know you made this page a long time ago, but I have a weird question. So I like doing this Cooler Cleanse, which is all raw, unpasteurized juices. One of which is an almond milk. The ingredients are listed as raw almonds, vanilla bean dates, filtered water. But for some reason, when I drink it, right at the beginning of each sip I have this strange sense-memory flavor experience. It tastes like the smell of latex band-aids from when I was a kid. Any idea what that’s about? I’ve never experienced it with any almond milk other than this one. Am I having a stroke?

    • Oh, weird! I’m not sure, as I haven’t tried the CC products. It may be preservatives or packaging, but of course there’s also a chance that the milk has gone off. If it’s at all bitter or tastes carbonated, don’t drink it. If it’s just a weird sensation of deja vu, I’d assume you’re good to go, if you can get over it 🙂

      • It’s certainly not preservatives or packaging. These juices are unpasteurized, cold pressed and raw. And every bottle I’ve ever had has tasted exactly the same (at least a dozen). In fact, another friend of mine has had a similar experience with this one. Overall, they are really fantastic juices. Maybe it’s just the variety of dates or vanilla beans that they use that just tastes a lil funky to me. Perhaps like when I eat lemongrass. If I actually chew the lemongrass, it tastes like Fruit Loops to me. Guess I’m just a weirdo.

  48. Thank you so much for this!!! Beautifully presented with a little sense of humour. Love nut milk!

    • I also have a Jack LaLanne juicer. It’s the Elite model. Could you please share with me your process of making almond milk. Did your juicer come with a pitcher-like attachment? especially for making nut milks, and if it did have you used it?

  49. Do u know the nutritional info for the nut milk?

    If you strain the milk and throw out the pulp, does that mean that the fat is retained in the pulp, thus making the milk low fat? How much fat is in the strained milk?

    Thanks!

  50. I loved this!!! I made mine with only 3 cups of water because that’s all that would fit in my blender and just a dash of salt. So wonderful! I can’t believe a carton of almond milk here in Australia costs $5.50 and I just made the same amount for a teeny tiny fraction of that cost! And less packaging was used, since I put it in an old spaghetti sauce jar. Hopefully there aren’t any leftover tomato flavors in the jar! Even when I return to California where almond milk is cheap I will still continue to make my own now because it was so easy! It was totally messy because my blender is too small and this was my first time but it is still completely worth it. Thanks so much for posting this tutorial!

    • Oh also – I am going to use my leftover almond pulp in Dreena Burton’s Red Pepper Hummus which I make with raw red pepper and I love! So nothing goes to waste! Yay!

  51. Does anyone know the nutritional data for the almond milk in this recipe? Also, what is the nutritional data for the almond pulp left behind?

  52. After you soak the almonds, do you change the water and use fresh to blend it? Or do you used the soaking water to blend?

    • I used the soaking water with good results. I figured there was probably good stuff in that water and didn’t want it to go to waste!

  53. Hey great directional!

    I know that silk makes a thicker cream like subsitute ideally for coffee, wondering if you have ever reduced you water while blending to make an almond cream?

  54. Normally, when I drink milk, I always feel terrible, but I love eating cereal. I am thinking of trying almond milk. Will try buying first and if I like almond milk, I will definitely try this recipe. It seems pretty simple. Thanks for the recipe.

  55. Just wanted to tell you how much I love your vanilla recipe! It is fabulous for making lattes and in oatmeal! Also, the pulp is superb for making almond biscotti!

  56. I know you said that you don’t like to go into nutritional facts, but I would love to make this for my family, and my daughter is a Type 1 diabetic. So I have to know how many carbs she is eating in order to dose her properly. So would you happen to know the carb ratio?

  57. also, to the people weighing the difference between boxed almond milk and homemade,soaked living almond milk: remember, tetrapaks are lined with BPA filled plastic and are somehow sealed/treated to last indefinitely on a shelf.

  58. I’m curious as to why you say to leave the almond milk in the nut bag for 45 minutes to drain. I squeeze mine and it’s done in less than a minute. I make my almond milk every morning in the time it takes to boil the tea water!

  59. Made this last night. Can’t get over how much better it is than store-bought. I only added 3 dates and it was sweet enough. And I LOVE the leftover pulp….mixed it with some cinnamon and added some to a smoothie for a little flavor and protein! (I also couldn’t resist eating about half of it with a spoon! Also, I just used paper towels and a metal strainer…worked just fine. Can’t wait to try the CHAI flavor!!!

  60. Just made some almond milk. My method was a bit different and pretty fast! I crushed the nuts to a pulp in a plastic bag with a hammer. I transferred the powder to another container and added a liberal amount of water. I let this set for about an hour and a half. Then into a warm pot and let come to simmer then back to low heat for about half an hour. Added a quick dash of sugar while it was warm. Then drained using an old (and clean) cotton shirt. Came out wonderful, I will suggest drinking it warm. Very smooth.

  61. For those of you asking about nutrition facts, here’s what I’ve come up with… Keep in mind, these numbers are from my own experience, and I took a few assumptions to be true. Now, ready to go back to high school for some math?! 🙂

    I used 1C whole almonds + 4C water.

    Here are some important figures from nutritiondata.com that allowed me to set this up:
    1C ground almonds = 95g
    1C water = 236g

    So, my total yield was exactly 4C almond milk, with 2C (this isn’t exact, but very close) pulp mixture (after squeezing).

    In that mixture, there was a specific quantity of almonds (a) and water (b). I ignored the original water content of almonds, as it’s very small (but, I’m sure, matters).

    So a+b=2.

    I weighed my pulp mixture on a non-digital food scale (again, possible source of inaccuracy, I’m sure a digital read-out in grams would be MUCH more accurate). It was 7.5oz, which is 210g.

    Knowing the density of water and ground almonds (b and a, respectively), we can say:

    95a + 236b = 210.

    If we take that with a + b = 2, we can solve the set of equations,
    which gives us a = 1.858 and b = .142. So in that mixture there are 1.858C ground almonds (176.5g, given 95g/C) and .142C water. If the 2C mixture was purely ground almonds, we’d have 190g, so we lost 13.5g of almonds.

    I’m assuming that this 13.5g leeched into the almond milk, and I’m assuming it was an equal leech of fat/protein/carbs (minus fiber). Given the nutrition facts for almonds (also available on nutritiondata.com), I came to the conclusion that each cup of almond milk contains 3.375g “almond content,” which comes to:

    1.91g fat
    .81g protein
    .366g carb

    Or, off the top of my head, about 23 calories/C, total.

    Again, this is very very haphazardly done, but it’s a baseline. If anyone else wants to replicate this with accurate figures (a digital scale/exact volume measurements of the almond pulp?) I’d love to see what you come up with.

    Ah, math on a Sunday morning.

    • Hi Mike,

      I am confused about your numbers because if you only used 1 cup of whole almonds to start with, how would there be 1.858 C ground almonds in the pulp mixture. Was it actually 2 cups that you began with?

      Thanks

    • Thanks for this! I’m wondering… if you served the milk as is (without getting rid of pulp) how many cups of almond milk this recipe makes? The nutritional content would obviously be very different if you didn’t lose 13.5 g of almonds.

  62. I’ve read somewhere that you should peel the almonds before making blending for milk. I made almond milk once WITHOUT soaking OR peeling them, and it tasted kind of bitter. But then I soaked, peeled, and dried them out, and they made delicious milk! I don’t know if it was the soaking or the peeling that did it, but I was wondering if you had any opinions on the matter.

  63. Thank you so much for sharing it was sooo helpful. I have one question though. Are the nut milks available at the markets truly RAW? I would truly appreciate your response.

    Thank you again,

    Elizabeth

  64. I heard that nuts are more digestible after soaking, and that the soaking water ought to be discarded, because it contains the enzyme inhibitors from the nuts…so is that untrue? I’ve noticed that the water from almonds and cashews and macadamia nuts is sweet, but the water from pecans and walnuts is bitter. That made me wonder if there’s a difference between the sweet tasting and bitter tasting water.

  65. Was researching almond Breeze vs Pacific almond milk when I came across this very interesting page. First off learned so much in just one page so def a fan and will be looking through your entire blog. Secondly, I am also curious if you recommend the almond breeze (or would you “not” recommend it), just tried the vanilla one and found delicious. Pacific has more of an after taste in my opinion. Also is there any truth to the comment about carageenans in almond breeze? Didn’t see in ingredients. Thank you very much…

  66. I’ve just started making nutmilk and invested in a nutmilk bag. A friend mentioned that I could also make juices this way (without buying a juicer!! and have been making some of the juices you suggested (http://www.thefullhelping.com/you-ask-i-deliver-my-top-ten-favorite-juice-recipes/). It just seems that everyone in your comments section was so sad that they did not have a juicer! The blender/nutmilk method seems to work just fine although perhaps I’m not getting as much out of the juice? Any idea?

  67. I will definitely be trying this! I have a toddler who can’t drink milk, normally I give him rice dream. But am looking for a less expensive option ($8/gallon here). If I made this for him should I fortify it with calcium? If so how much should I add?

  68. Thanks for the recipe! but i don’t understand how it is cheaper to make your almond milk, at the grocery/health food store almonds are almost always upwards of $7 a pound, if it takes i pound to make 3 cups it only costs $2.75 for a half gallon of blue diamond or Silk almond milk. do you guys know a cheaper source?

    • This recipe calls for 1 cup almonds, which is far less than 1 lb (perhaps 4-6 oz?). In Canada I can easily get organic unpasteurized almonds for $8/lb. As far as I know blue diamond isn’t organic, but I could be wrong. I hope you can find a source for unroasted almonds for less than $7/lb!

  69. Thank you for the info! I am new to raw foods and was wondering if the Blue Diamond Almond Breeze Milk was actually considered a raw food/drink. Thanks so much!!

    • i think the commercial product is pasteurized. but blue diamond and many others aren’t organic, and they all add thickening agents and cane sugar that you probably don’t need if you want to go raw and healthy.

  70. So, I just made this and had great success. I am, however, poor, so I used a pair of clean pantyhose instead of cheesecloth and it worked like a charm!

  71. Is there anyway to figure out the nutritional breakdown of this? I would like to try and make this and have Type 1 diabetes so need to know the info…..thanks 🙂

  72. Hi,

    Great article.

    Note of caution re: Almond Milk: There is a lot of evidence (going back to 1972) that carageenan, a thickener made from seaweed, can cause cancer and ulcerations. I know Blue Diamond’s ‘Almond Breeze’ contains carageenans. Haven’t looked into the other brands that you mentioned but will. Love the make it yourself instructions. Thanks.

  73. Great post, Love! Nut and seed milks are definitely awesome and the way to go. My personal favorite (because of the nutrition) is Raw hemp seed milk. But, I also love Raw almond milk, too!

    Cheers,
    Kristen

  74. […] with rainbow chard, homemade raw almond milk (more on that wonderful substance later, and thank you Gena for the recipe!), my favorite vegan protein powder, the Rainbow Energizer, some frozen papaya (for […]

  75. Thanks a lot for the recipe! I’m going to try it soon! You look stunning esp. in the pic with Jenna, what a glow of your skin..definitely the benefits of eating so healthy

  76. Thank you for posting this, I made vanilla almond milk and it was delicious! The leftover almonds were amazing in my oatmeal this morning. I put the milk in a smoothie too and it was subtle and awesome!

  77. Wow, this was really good! I was really hesitant at first, but once I tried it this morning out of the fridge and it was delicious!

    What a great way to save some mula! Thanks for the post!

  78. Hi Gena, thanks for the recipe and tutorial! I was just wondering when you used to buy almond milk did you get the sweetened or unsweetened version? I have a hard time drinking the unsweetened but I love vanilla sweetened but I’m not sure I am doing anything better for myself by drinking sugar.

  79. Perfect timing, as usual. I bought a nut milk bag a while ago and just used the last of my boxed almond milk. The time has come! I have visions of almond milk smoothies with juicer pulp dancing in my head. I am determined not to waste pulp! (Says the girl who chucked 2 juices’ worth of pulp just this morning…nobody’s perfect.)

    Plus my food processor arrived this weekend so I would say I am officially hooked UP in the appliance department. Time to get freakay in the kitch.

  80. Hi Gena!! i absolutly LOVE almond milk and have made it multiple times until a few months ago when i read that blending almonds and water produces CYANIDE!! a deadly poison! have you heard of this?? please inform me of what you know on this topic as it has spooked me away from almond milk! 🙁
    <3 Dara

    • Do not worry about making poison mixing almonds and water. This only applies to Bitter Almonds. Not the kind found in grocery stores. If the package does NOT say bitter almonds, they aren’t.

  81. I love making my own almond milk! Well, actually I don’t love making it (since I’m lacking in the nut bag department…hehe, that sounds funny…sorry, I’m like, 12). I strain my pulp through a thin wash cloth, and it’s a pain in the arse. But the reward is worth it. I love the vanilla kind, but I’m also loving the different flavors in the Ani book…the Made in Mexico Mylk (carob and cinnamon) is the best!

    • i read on another blog how someone uses old tights or stockings (clean, obv) to strain pulp-y juice and nut milks. try that!

  82. that looks so easy! I’m going to have to try this once I finish my “box” of almond milk in the fridge 🙂 Thanks Gena!

  83. Hi Gena,
    thank you so much for your detailed description of how to make milk! Last night, after reading it I have finally made hemp milk, and it tastes so good! I hope my kids (1 and 2 years) will also like it, I have read it has many health benefits. The only problem is that I don’t know what to do with the pulp. I used unshelled hemp seeds, and it does not taste like a treat at all 😀 lol.
    Thanks again, I find your blog very informative and I read it every day.

  84. As much as I want to make almond milk, I am lazy so let’s not count on it. But I do want to find That’s Nut Milk! I have never seen it — it’s at healthfood stores? That would solve my problem because I have some issues with ingredients in Blue Diamond, which I used to use but now won’t…. Thanks for this!

    • Hey D! You can find it at Gary Null’s Uptown Whole Foods on 90th and Bway. And while you’re there, you may or may not run into me or Elise 🙂

      xo

  85. hey, i just wanted to confirm what you said in your previous post regarding soy- it is definitely mucus producing. i decided to do a little test. i have colon hydrotherapy about once a month, so three times i had no soy and things went normally. Each consecutive time i had one serving of soy soy, just once, within the week of my colon hydrotherapy appointment, mucus showed up. I did that twice. the proof is in the pudding..or poop. hah. hurrah for nut milk!

  86. ive seen that’s nut milk at GN’s whole foods…havent tried it yet though.

    btw, after checking out your appliances page, i think im just going to send out that link for my (err…our) wedding registry

    in the meantime, should i get a cheapo food processor to tide me over? im DYING with all these recipes that require it.

  87. i finally stopped putting in cow’s milk with my cereal and I noticed a big difficult in my energy level. I’m no longer lethargic after breakfast. To include some protein in my meal, I munch on some almonds since I’m too lazy to make almond milk. I’m surprised the commercial ones (like Almond Breeze) put quite a few add ins as I read the ingredient list.

  88. so generous of you to share, gena! i go through so many boxes of almond milk i’ve recently started to feel badly about all the trash i’m generating.

    i’m so excited to learn how to make my own!

  89. I was recently devastated to learn that I have a low intolerance to almonds. Almonds! My beloved nut. (I’m also equally intolerant to soy, rice, walnuts, oats, and cow’s milk – so my milk choices are slim, as I loath hemp milk and feel iffy on brazil nut milk and cashew milk.)

    This is probably a question I can ask my doctor, but do you think my homemade almond milk is easier on my stomach then say, hey, a handful of almonds. I’m “allowed” to eat my low intolerance foods (I’m intolerant to about every food on the planet – the highest being chocolate! *sobs* – so I can’t give up everything), but now I’m somewhat fearful… I guess I’m just curious on your thoughts on the subject. I’m pining for some freshly blended almond milk right now. 🙁 … That a chunk of dark 90% chocolate!

  90. I think I’ve already told you about my lifelong addiction to soy milk, having been weened on soy formula as a babe, and the lifelong chronic health conditions that accompanied said addiction. Well, since giving up the daily soy milk, I discovered homemade almond milk. Don’t have it everyday, or even every week for that matter, but like you said, sometimes a gal needs her nut milk and cookies.

    I’m laughing out loud though…the rubber band idea…ingenious! Never even crossed my mind. Doh! See, this is why you’re a living foods health coach and I’m not. 😀

  91. yummm i love homemade almond milk! last time i made it, i didn’t strain it and just ate it all chunky- it was like a milkshake 😀 i’m totally going to invest in a nut milk bag, though
    i’ve had those raweos before and they are GLORIOUS!
    have a wonderful sunday <3

  92. Hi Gena,

    I would love to try this recipe but I have a few questions first. I once tried to make homemade almond butter but it did not work. Someone told me that it could have been because the almonds were not raw (they were pasteurized). Does this recipe need to be completed with unpasteurized almonds? I can’t find these anywhere! Please let me know. Thanks!

  93. First, I must admit that your posts are always detailed, informative and well-written. You are just a bundle of information! Thank you for taking the time into making each post relative and useful- this makes your blog a pleasure to read.

    On the subject, I buy and use a lot of nut milk- my favorite being Blue Diamond Unsweetened vanilla almond milk. This post as inspired me to take it to the next level and try making my own (not sure when, but sometime!). I have actually made homemade brown rice milk before and enjoyed it very much, but I think I will like the flavor of nut milk better. One of these days when I’m feeling ambitious I’m going to give it a shot. I’ll be sure to let you know how it goes.

    Also, do you store your homemade almond milk in the fridge and how long will it keep?

  94. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! I’ve been meaning to make my own almond milk for the longest time. I’m totally going to buy some almonds now.

    I keep seeing those raweos at WF and almost buy them every time. i might just cave and get them.

  95. Hey Gena!
    I have a quick question about almond milk and nut milks in general. I’ve always been hesitant to make my own because I rely on my milk alternatives as a significant source of calcium in my diet. Do you have any idea what the nutritional breakdown is on homemade almond milk? Does much of the calcium from the almonds actually end up in the milk (especially if you strain it)?
    Thanks, I love the blog!

    • Hi Sara,

      I don’t know the answer to that — as I say in the reply above you, I don’t support looking at nutritional labels/info aside from ingredients for a variety of reasons. I also believe that the real key to bone density is to keep an alkaline system (by not putting acidic, high proteins foods in the body), as well as getting adequate leafy greens. In fairness, though, I’m pretty sure that almond milk is not a high calcium source.

      Gena

  96. GREAT!! We’ve never actually talked about the brands you recommend – I used to use Pacific Foods vanilla almond milk a lot, but wasn’t so sure about it (I think it had lecithin in it, which is why I stopped using it). And “That’s Nut’s Milk” is definitely NOT available here – bummer!!

    Oh yes, Melissa has told me allll about raweos 🙂 Holy yum.

  97. great step by step gena! i really want to try “that’s nuts”-sounds delicious! i usually make my own though, i’ve tried a couple different ways…maybe i should get a nut bag but i’ve found a small strainer works just as well!

    maybe you can post this link:
    http://cottchz.wordpress.com/2009/06/26/moooover-over-…ew-nut-in-town/

    it compares almond milk to other milks with some facts.

    i’ve never tried it with 6 figs i’ve always only put 2 in..hmm…though i have to say, Amaretto Agave….YUMMERS!!!!!!

    oh, one question, can u soak almonds too long and make them go bad which would make your milk go bad more quickly? i live in a hot humid environment, the south, and sometimes i’ve noticed that if i get lazy and forget i’ve soaked my almonds leaving them for say 24hrs and then make it the next day, my milk goes bad faster…….

    • Hi Faith —

      I’m not going to post a link with nutritional facts because I don’t encourage/support looking at nutritional information that isn’t simply the ingredients of a food — and in this case, you know the ingredients! But thanks!

      If it’s very, very hot, leave them out for four hours to soak or soak in the fridge, and simply make it right away.

      Gena

  98. This is a great post, I love almond milk, and now I know how to make it! Super excited to make some chocolate milk!

  99. I really appreciate this post because almond milk is really expensive here and I had no idea it was this easy to make myself! Question, when soaking it, is that just an arbitrary amount of water, or is that the pre-measured 4 cups? I assume it is just a small amount, and then after soaking, you drain the almonds and combine in the blender with the 4c? Hope that makes sense.

  100. looks so good, i have been thinking about this for a few days after reading the recipe in a raw cookbook in Barnes and nobles 🙂 great idea so many options,and different nuts u could use..thanks for sharing.

    xo
    maya

  101. Thanks for the photo tutorial Gena, even though I already do make my own almond milk in my Vita-Mix….sometimes. Sometimes I just get the LowFat Vanilla Pacific Brand from TJ’s and call it a day. But it’s always nice to see others’ renditions of homemade nut milk. Cashew milk is great, too, and I know Sarma raves about Mac Nut milk in her books…may have to try that, too. Life is soooo much better for me since I went dairy free about 3 years ago. Thanks for the post!

  102. Oooo great tutorial Gena, do you think I can make this in a standard blender?

    Also, how long do you think this will last in the fridge? Also, do you think the nutritional content is similar to that of (unsweetend) almond milk on the supermarket shelves? thanks!

    😀

    • Hi Cecilia!

      A regular blender will be totally fine. I do not support looking at nutritional labels (aside from ingredients), but I do think that the breakdown is similar here, yes.

      Gena

      • Beautiful job, well done and thank you for the idea of chocolate and chai milk. I just had some delicious homemade almond milk today. Yummy. Blessings of health and peace.

  103. Ooh thanks for the tutorial! I’m def more of a lazy, purchase Blue Diamond almond milk type of woman.
    I’m glad you like the raweos. I thought they were el nasto!

  104. I’m drooling over your Vita Mix. I like the looks of those Raweos too, but I lust for the VM. I tried really hard to break my blender today. I’ve got a presentation all ready to give Chris to convince him to buy the big guy.

    Hope the rest of your weekend is fab!

  105. yum. I haven’t heard of That’s Nuts milk. I will have to look out for it. I typically go for pacific. yum yum raweos. This is a great easy recipe, a great way to save some dough.

  106. You are a mind reader; I’ve been thinking about homemade almond milk. Cookies and milk, I haven’t had that in ages! Is there anything wrong with rice milk?

  107. Thank you soooo much for posting this; I have been wondering how to make almond milk. I always buy it and assumed I could make it, I just didn’t know how. Once again, another wonderful recipe from you! Thank you!