Weekend Reading, 1.6.18
January 6, 2019

Weekend Reading | The Full Helping

A week-long head cold wasn’t how I planned to begin 2019, but the nice thing about having some time off from the DI is that I’ve been able to absolutely nothing in the last few days, aside from drinking tea, answering emails from my phone, and catching up on television.

In the past, I’ve been great at talking about the importance of rest and slowing down, very bad at actually doing those things without an overlay of guilt or nervousness about what isn’t getting done. It’s amazing how fully and happily I’ve embraced staying put this week. I’m so grateful I feel that I can actually let things slow to a halt and give my body a chance to recharge.

In the spirit of not filling up my time any more than I need to, I’m keeping the weekend reading intro short today—with the sincere hope that, even amidst the hustle and energy of a new year, you can all find small pockets of rest and restoration this week, too.

Enjoy the reads and recipes, everyone!

Recipes

First, I’m loving Sue’s bright, crisp, and colorful black-eyed pea salad for the new year.

I make a lot of tofu scrambles, but I haven’t made one with different spice blends or global flavors in quite a long time. I’m getting inspiration from this vibrant curry tofu scramble, via Gastroplant.

Vegan comfort food perfection: a creamy baked gnocchi dish with lemon zest.

I never say no to a dish with pearl couscous! This seasonal salad also has pumpkin and pomegranate arils, and it’s easy to veganize by using maple syrup in the dressing.

Christmas may be over, but I’ve never been more excited to bake. These chewy vegan ginger almond cookies look fantastic, and they’re now at the top of my list.

Reads

1. Amanda Mull has some critical, humorous, and compelling thoughts on cosumerism and the culture of New Year’s resolutions. I especially liked this:

Accepting the fundamental fact of myself has allowed me to take stock of the things I do and to change the things within my control that I dislike. None of that has involved buying something on sale.

“Accepting the fundamental fact of myself”—sounds so simple, yet what a challenge it is, and how freeing when it actually happens.

2. I had a very difficult time reading this New York Times piece on wildlife electrocution, but it’s an important topic and worth sharing.

3. An interesting new approach to treating addiction by modulating memory.

4. I couldn’t believe how science writer Josie Glausiusz has often been told to make her articles digestible: by writing “[s]tories that pass the “Aunt Myrtle” test—would your hypothetical elderly aunt be able to appreciate our work?”

Glausiusz writes,

Along with many other science journalists, I have encountered this stereotype time and again. We are advised to ask scientists to explain their research to “your granny,” “to your mother or a ninth-grader,” to “Aunt Gladys.” As Einstein supposedly said in innumerably repeated memes, “You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother.” (The quote is “probably not by Einstein,” according to the Ultimate Quotable Einstein, published by Princeton University Press.)…

The well-worn formula is a prime example of the subtle ways in which sexism pervades science in a manner so entrenched that it is difficult to recognize. We are never asked to explain science to “your dad” or “your granddad.”

Kudos to the writer for sounding off about this kind of sexism and ageism in science journalism!

5. And while we’re on the topic of women and science, an awesomely comprehensive reading list.

Wishing you a great start to the second week of 2019, friends. Be back this week with an easy slow cooker recipe, which can transition perfectly into plenty of not-quite-a-recipe recipes.

xo

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    3 Comments
  1. Black-eyed pea salad looks like a winner for a new year take to work lunch.
    Thanks
    Gena

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