Weekend Reading
November 22, 2020

Weekend Reading | The Full Helping

I asked for an extension on a big project this week.

I’d been trying to avoid it, telling myself that an urgent deadline is a good motivator and that I could get it done if I really pushed hard.

But my ability to work in a time crunch just isn’t what it used to be. And, like many people, I’ve been having a lot of issues with productivity this year.

I know that an extension only draws out the process of completion. Still, asking for it was the right call. It was a relief. And the even greater relief came when I was told yes, extension granted.

The gentle, relaxed response of the person who I’d asked about the deadline also reminded me that things rarely turn out as badly as I expect them to.

I sometimes challenge myself, when I’m ruminating over a scary outcome, to default to the assumption that things will turn out well. It’s amazing how hard it is for me to do that. Given two possible outcomes, it’s always my tendency to imagine that the undesirable one will happen.

More and more these days, I realize that I can’t get back time that I spend worrying about the future. I also won’t get back the time I spend wrongly assuming that worst case scenarios will come to pass.

They usually don’t. And when they do, the outcome is no less painful because I spent time anticipating it.

What if things work out? What if I succeed? What if that thing I’m dreading turns out to be fun? What if the conversation I’m stressing about surprises me? What if I meet someone wonderful?

These are the questions I’m trying to ask myself lately, just as often as I ask consider the doom-and-gloom “what ifs.”

There are usually at least a few possibilities alive in any given moment. There’s something to be said for soberly acknowledging that things might not go the way we want them to. But surely there’s something very wrong with only considering the possibilities we fear.

It would have been a lovely surprise if I’d been able to make my deadline work in the first place. But, since I couldn’t, having more time to work was the next best thing. And it was surprising in its own way, a reminder that honesty pays off and that people are usually pretty understanding.

Wishing you a week of positive thinking. By that, I don’t mean a refusal to look at difficulty or disappointment.

I wish you the willingness to see that life is full of possibilities. And sometimes it’s kinder than we expect it to be.

Happy Sunday, friends. Here are some recipes and reads.

Recipes

I’m extremely excited to veganize Jessica’s pumpkin focaccia (maple syrup in place of honey, and vegan parmesan—easy!).

I really love celery root, and I don’t cook with it often enough. Katie’s simple recipe is inspiring me.

Drooling over Isabel’s Mexican Candied Sweet Potatoes.

A bright, crispy shaved Brussels sprout salad from Amanda.

I’ve never pulled off a good vegan pecan pie. So I’ll just rely on Izy’s recipe to guide me.

Reads

1. Distressing news about the rise in Americans’ food insecurity in the time of Covid. I’ve been donating to my local faith-based food pantry, so appreciative of their mobile, outdoor pantry that’s serving hundreds of New Yorkers every morning.

2. A look, via The New York Times, at how the efficacy of Covid vaccines is being modeled. It’s sobering, but really interesting from a study design perspective.

3. A scientific answer to a question that every baker has pondered: what’s the difference between baking soda and baking powder?

4. I loved this look at seven women who overcame personal struggles during the pandemic.

5. I’ve never spent more time ruminating on my regrets and mistakes than I have this year. This article on self-forgiveness meant a lot to me. Maybe it’ll mean something to you, too.

I’m so happy that a lot of you are excited about my mashed potato holiday bowl. And I’ve got another, low-key holiday recipe for you tomorrow.

Till then,

xo

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    1 Comment
  1. Hi Gena,

    Your thoughts on retraining our mind to expect positive outcomes as opposed to constant deference to gloomy ones were just what I needed. Thank you for sharing. You have really helped me Gena.

    To Good Things,

    Monica

You might also like

Happy Sunday, everyone. I was happy to see such supportive and thoughtful responses to Alisa’s green recovery story on Friday (and I got a few green recovery submissions over email that night, which is always a big treat). Thank you for sharing your impressions, and if you haven’t read Alisa’s perspective, it’s really thought-provoking and worth exploring. It’s the end of another busy week, and so I took some moments this morning to catch up on health and wellness news, recipes from around the…

Happy Sunday, all! I hope you had nice weekends. Mine has flown by with reading and writing for school, as well as client work. I’m sure this sentiment will change a little as my semester continues, but I have to admit that no amount of school reading feels like too much right now. After so many years of problem sets and computations, it’s a joy to be dwelling in words again, and the fact that I’m interested in the material only enhances my…

A week-long head cold wasn’t how I planned to begin 2019, but the nice thing about having some time off from the DI is that I’ve been able to absolutely nothing in the last few days, aside from drinking tea, answering emails from my phone, and catching up on television. In the past, I’ve been great at talking about the importance of rest and slowing down, very bad at actually doing those things without an overlay of guilt or nervousness about what isn’t…

Happy Sunday, friends. I hope this weekend reading post finds you staying warm and well. It’s been a hectic few days here, as I finish up a big freelance project in time for the start of my new semester. Amazingly, that semester begins this coming Thursday. It feels as if my first semester just ended, and I wonder if I’ll feel the same way in May, at which point my whole first year will be behind me. When I first told people I was going…