Weekend Reading, 4.19.15
April 19, 2015

Weekend Reading | The Full Helping

A big thank you to everyone who kindly read and commented on Steven’s post on Thursday! In case you missed the post, my boyfriend said a few words about his fear of coming across as a “difficult” customer, now that he’s eating vegan with me in restaurants. The topic really seemed to resonate, and I encourage you to continue commenting and asking questions (a few readers have asked me to say more in the future about ordering off the menu, which I’ll try to do).

And now, I’m catching up on work and feeling inspired by this roundup of recipes and reads.

a_house_in_the_hills_potato_chickpea_salad_3

Lots of vegetable splendor in this weekend reading, starting with Sarah Yates’ beautiful roasted potato and paprika chickpea salad. What can beat the potato + paprika combination, I ask you?

Etc-Inspiration-Blog-Fennel-Roasted-Carrot-And-Shallot-Salad-Recipe-With-Shaved-Apple-Via-Dolly-And-Oatmeal-Sesame-Seeds

It was posted a few months ago, but I’m loving Lindsey’s fennel-roasted carrot and shallot salad with shaved apples. Pretty enough to be a restaurant appetizer, but homey and rustic, too.

Fare+Isle+-+Spicy+Stewed+Greens+-+Vegan+&+Gluten+Free

These spicy stewed greens from Fare Isle look divine; perfect to pear with basmati rice, polenta, or even toast.

download

I’ve tried making quinoa falafel in the past, but the texture has always been a bit of a challenge (since quinoa is such a small and un-sticky grain). Looks as though Amy of Sobremesa nailed it with these herby quinoa falafel with tahini lemon sauce.

17162774745_9fc0f7d494_b 17136849766_92d30fe860_b

Finally, my New Veganism column this week features delicate-yet-sturdy, sweet-or-savory vegan crepes. They are awesome, and I encourage you to check them out!

Reads

1. A cool article from Dan Buettner (author of The Blue Zones) on Okinawan women and their diets. Okinawans have famously long lifespans, on average, and Buettner is exploring whether or not the foods they eat may hold some of the secrets to their incredibly longevity. Traditionally, dietary superstars for Okinawan women include a rich amount of carbohydrates (about 80% of their diet), especially sweet potatoes and rice, soy foods, and seaweed. Fish, meat (usually pork that had had most of its fat skimmed off), and poultry constituted about 2% of their overall diet.

Buettner makes clear that, since the arrival of fast food, Okinawans’ rates of lung, breast, and colon cancer have almost doubled, but the study of their diets in 1949–before Western influences had taken hold–is really interesting.

2. Speaking of soy foods, a fantastic article from Ginny Messina in Today’s Dietitian on tofu and its many uses.

3. There’s a lot of debate about what the “right” or the healthiest amount of exercise is. I’m not sure that this is a question to which we’ll ever get definitive answers, but Gretchen Reynolds wrote an interesting article on the topic for The New York Times this week, highlighting findings from two recent, comprehensive studies in JAMA Internal Medicine. It seems that the “sweet spot” is more than a lot of people do, but less than many people think they have to do. And even a little exercise lowers risk of premature death by 20%.

4. Also in the New York Times, a deeply touching article by Frank Bruni. It is a tribute to Bruni’s father, and especially to the generosity of spirit that has allowed him to continue living and giving in the years since Bruni’s mother unexpectedly passed away. Bruni writes,

He has figured out what makes him happiest, and it’s doing the little bit that he can to nudge the people he loves toward their own contentment…Here’s what happened, on this milestone birthday of his, when we finally found the right blackjack table and fanned out around him and it was time for his trick:

He asked each of us — his kids, our life mates — to stretch out a hand. And into every palm he pressed two crisp hundred-dollar bills, so that our initial bets would be on him and we would start out ahead of the game.

“See?” he said. “You’re already a winner.”

That was it — his secret for blackjack, which is really his secret for life, and has nothing, obviously, to do with the money, which we’re blessed enough not to need too keenly and he’s blessed enough not to miss too badly.

It has to do with his eagerness, in this late stage of life, to make sure that we understand our primacy in his thoughts and his jubilation in our presence. It has to do with his expansiveness.”

Lovely.

Finally, a fascinating article in Food and Wine on the science of how our palates mature over time, allowing us to embrace and develop a taste for foods we’d previously disliked.

I wish you a restful Sunday and a great start to the week ahead!

xo

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    8 Comments
  1. Always so much goodness! Love all the veggies in this weeks recipes:) And I’m interested in checking out the exercise article, as there is always so much back and forth on the subject.

  2. Hi Gena,

    These posts are awesome, for the rare occasions when I have some spare time to read 🙂 … Especially loved the one about foods we like now that we disliked in the past. I keep putting on the table healthy food that my girls don’t necessarily like now as I know their taste preferences change all the time at this young age, and this article strengthened me to keep doing that.

You might also like

I’ve been thinking a lot about taking responsibility lately. For the past few weeks, the process of slowly and patiently taking care of my responsibilities—academic, personal, business, financial, and the tiny tasks and duties associated with everyday living—have been a big part of staying healthy and engaged as I weather a patch of depression. It’s not about keeping busy, which has been my way of trying to outrun sadness in the past. It’s about reminding myself of my own capability and efficacy, proving…

Happy weekend, everyone. I hope you’re enjoying a little springtime weather and some rest! Lots of interesting reads in this week’s roundup of recipes and articles, as well as some great springtime meal ideas. On Thursday I mentioned how much I appreciate super speedy meals these days. Margaret’s awesome tofu scramble tostadas fit the bill. Her tofu scramble recipe is a snap to make, and you could easily use canned refried vegan black beans in place of the hummus if you’re short on time….

My pattern for the last few weeks has been to feel extremely optimistic about my productivity level on Friday night, when the weekend begins, and completely overwhelmed by midday Sunday. I was so behind on so many things yesterday that I decided to save this blog post for my lunch break today, and I’m glad I did. It feels good to write with a little peace and clarity, even if it’s later than I hoped. It’s no secret that Melody Beattie is one…

My voice is hoarse from singing, and lots of it. I was at a kirtan last night at my yoga studio, basking in that awesome community and the friendships I’ve made within it. The kirtan featured mash ups of Vedic chants and contemporary songs: the Beatles, Magnetic Fields, Madonna. The kirtan purist in me was a little affronted when I heard that the program would work this way, but I’m glad that I kept an open mind. It was wonderful. Kirtan and yoga:…